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Easter on the BBC


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Easter is a far more important festival in the Christian calendar than even Christmas, though most of the British population celebrate Christmas to a much greater extent than they do Easter.

Tomorrow, on Easter Sunday, the BBC gives us:

10:00 to 11:00 Songs of Praise live from Canterbury Cathedral

11:00 to 11:30 Urbi etc Orbi - the Pope's Easter message broadcast from Rome

11:30 to 12:30 Gareth Malone's Easter Passion

1:30 to 2:05 Songs of Praise on Easter Sunday

6:00 to 8:00 Gareth Malone's Easter Passion (continued)

Strange then that the Daily Telegraph headline on the "BBC abandoning Easter". Or is it just an attempt to provoke an "anti-woke" outrage over another non-existent story?

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That’s pretty good for the BBC! Last year I had a letter published in the Daily Mail which asked how you could tell from the listings of all tv channels that it was Good Friday. Maybe things are improving!

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8 hours ago, Sparkler said:

Another stolen pagan festival 🙄

Are you trying to provoke an anti-woke outrage? I'll simply point out that Passover is not a pagan festival, and the event of Jesus' crucifixion is accepted by historians. The event of Easter Sunday some 2,000 years ago is more controversial, but certainly not taken from some other pagan faith.

AB is correct; Easter is a far more important date on the Christian calendar than is Christmas! Thank you for the TV times.

Enjoy your Easter eggs, everyone!

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2 hours ago, Sparkler said:

I will simply ask… and what do eggs, bunnies and the fact that it moves in the calendar have to do with supposed historical events?

Easter is about rebirth, so the eggs are pretty obvious. It has nothing to do with bunnies. But Easter Sunday is always the first Sunday, following the first full moon, following the Spring Equinox. So it follows the lunar calendar, rather than the solar one. As does the Jewish feast of Passover. Does following the lunar Calendar make it any less relevant than if it was fixed? Or would you simply be asking how can Good Friday be on Tuesday 6th April?

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There is infinitely better documentary evidence for the existence of Jesus than there is for, say, Julius Caesar. 
As C S Lewis wrote, Jesus was either mad - a lunatic who thought he was God; bad - he deliberately lied about who he was; or he was who he said he was. 

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2 hours ago, Alteredbhoy said:

Easter is about rebirth, so the eggs are pretty obvious. It has nothing to do with bunnies. But Easter Sunday is always the first Sunday, following the first full moon, following the Spring Equinox. So it follows the lunar calendar, rather than the solar one. As does the Jewish feast of Passover. Does following the lunar Calendar make it any less relevant than if it was fixed? Or would you simply be asking how can Good Friday be on Tuesday 6th April?

Missing the whole point… if it’s some Christian celebration of an actual event, which it clearly is not, then it would not move. It’s the Christian appropriation of an existing pagan festival of rebirth and renewal, just like Christmas is the rebranding of the pagan festival of the winter solstice. 
All stolen and repurposed for the “new” religion.

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58 minutes ago, Sparkler said:

Missing the whole point… if it’s some Christian celebration of an actual event, which it clearly is not, then it would not move. It’s the Christian appropriation of an existing pagan festival of rebirth and renewal, just like Christmas is the rebranding of the pagan festival of the winter solstice. 
All stolen and repurposed for the “new” religion.

I'm surprised that you appear so uninformed on this subject, Sparkler. The Jewish calendar is a lunar calendar. Passover moves around year to year. Jesus was crucified on the Friday (sixth day) of Passover, because Saturday is the Jewish sabbath and it was unlawful to kill a person on the sabbath, the seventh day of the Jewish Week, when God rested, according to Genesis. In the NT, Mark 16 tells us the women went to the tomb on the first day of the week, when the sabbath was over, so we know they went there on what we call Sunday, hence Easter Sunday.

Easter IS the celebration of an actual event, and it moves for the reason AB and I have explained.

On the other hand, Christmas (which is on a fixed day of the year), was definitely a conscription of a pagan festival. The Bible does not give a definitive date in the year for Jesus' birth. Mark's gospel skips that whole business and kicks off with John the Baptist.

2 hours ago, Duffy21 said:

Faith seems to install a lot of lunacy into many people.

As someone who is not religious i find Easter just like Christmas.

One big commercial rip off.

Thank God, then that Easter is only 4 days long, whereas these days Christmas seems to begin in October in the stores.

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17 minutes ago, Sparkler said:

Thank you, you confirm that Easter predates Christ and therefore Christianity.

Your desperation to criticise Christianity is leading you to saying the most bizarre things..

Easter is the celebration of the resurrection of Christ. It does not predate him. It took place shortly after the Jewish Passover and is celebrated shortly after the Passover.

Your logic is akin to saying that because the Queen's Jubilee took place in June, and June has been a named month since Roman times, the Jubilee in June predates the Queen.

It is decidedly illogical.

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To be fair that is not strictly true. Easter is really known as Pascha; which of course means Passover. Used in both the Greek and Roman Churches to this day. So, it clearly does still have connections with the Jewish faith. 

Going on our only source from Bede "The Reckoning of Time" where he used Eosturmonap. Which Bede himself translates into "Paschal month" Which means Passover month. 

Which was as you rightly said a month names after Eostre a pagan Goddess, who was celebrated in about April (the start o spring). However I suspect that is to make it easier for non Latin speakers in Britain to understand.

So where I will agree the English term and indeed some of the rituals have roots in pagan theology. If you look at the origin of the event as laid down by the council of Nicaea it is clearly rooted in the Jewish faith. 

 

   

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9 hours ago, Sparkler said:

Feel free to research the origins of the name “Easter”… Nothing to do with any Christian person but a pagan goddess of fertility. Are you suggesting that Christians worshipped a pagan goddess?

oremus Bible Browser : Exodus 12:14-27

The meal which Jesus ate with his disciples would have occurred on the 14th day of the first month. Since the Jewish sabbath started on the following evening, being a lunar calendar, historians are uncertain whether He was crucified in 30CE or 33CE, as both lunar months would have fitted the narrative.

oremus Bible Browser : Mark 14:12-25

Nylon10 sets a good example by going back as far as he could, to a more contemporary account.

Edited by c_cubed51
punctuation error
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Telly is the same. I went to see a professional snooker tournament once, and between shots everyone in the afternoon dunce was telling the person next to them what the next shot should be - ‘he needs to come off the cushion, on to the green, which sets him up for the black’. Naturally the professionals did it completely differently!

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@Sparkler, clearly there are some sensitive issues here for some people. People who seek solace in Faith rarely look to question their teachings, it's part and parcel of how religion works. Trying to share conflicting ideas or findings with them really is like trying to teach a fish to ride a bicycle. 

I know where you are coming from, not being a follower of any preordained faith myself I tend to read about and learn how different faiths operate and what they believe in. It's quite shocking to me how so much conflict can be based in the most minor of disagreements in what is believed to be sacrosanct.

For anyone who is curious about where Sparkler is coming from have a look at this article https://www.history.co.uk/articles/the-pagan-roots-of-easter

I will simply say, if you want to click the link and read, good for you, if you don't, good for you too. But please when it comes to religious conversation, let's keep it amicable and respectful, the one thing we all have in common is that we are all human and of this earth. 

Peace

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 31/03/2024 at 01:17, Sparkler said:

Another stolen pagan festival 🙄

It's only called 'Easter' in German and English after a month name which might be named after a non-Christian goddess. We also have weekday names from non-Christian gods...so what? They simply refer to the month the festival tends to fall on.

In most other languages it's still called Passover, including most European languages. And if you're an actual Christian it's a very serious time of fasting, remembrance of Christ's death and resurrection and has nothing to do with the commercial secularisation most people seem to now associate with it.

The idea that it's a 'stolen' pagan festival is easily debunked. 

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