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(f)fwornforyou

stockings/tights in the freezer

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I don't if anyone has heard of this before, i read an article yesterday that the best way to protect stockings/tights from runs/snags and colour loss is to put them in the freezer before you wear them for the first time. You only have to do it once and this then helps to protect your nylons as it seems freezing the fibres helps them resist runs etc. I'm sure any scientists out there can explain this far better than me!!

It seems to apply to all nylon, no matter how sheer or opaque they are!!

Anything that can keep my stockings look good and snag free is good so i'll be trying this:)

 

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Hi FF, makes interesting reading.  So buy them, freeze them (with the peas), de-frost (Sunday morning before lunch), wear, wash.  Have I got this right?  ;-)

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I've heard of it before but never tried, or no anyone that has.

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I've not heard anything like that so I can't say it will not work.  I do know this however!  After washing stockings I'll squeeze the excess water out and put them in a plastic bag and into the freezer.  The cold will freeze the dampness which will shrink the stockings back into their original shape, especially at the knee!  This process will remove that baggy look from already worn stockings.

In all my stockings wearing years I've not seen or experienced color loss after washing.  I'm talking older brands so I can't say anything about how color is set in today's hosiery.

Give what you say here a try.  I doubt it will hurt anything?

Welcome to Shq!

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i have read about this before , maybe true for real nylons and it's a manmade material and it would make it return to it's old condition when heated . 

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1 hour ago, HanesBaby-CSB said:

I've not heard anything like that so I can't say it will not work.  I do know this however!  After washing stockings I'll squeeze the excess water out and put them in a plastic bag and into the freezer.  The cold will freeze the dampness which will shrink the stockings back into their original shape, especially at the knee!  This process will remove that baggy look from already worn stockings.

In all my stockings wearing years I've not seen or experienced color loss after washing.  I'm talking older brands so I can't say anything about how color is set in today's hosiery.

Give what you say here a try.  I doubt it will hurt anything?

Welcome to Shq!

Hi HanesBaby-CSB, nice to see you back

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Greetings there F.

This is an old topic though as with many one that comes on again and nary  a situation with the asking. After all, this is a knowledge exchange place.

The method is loosely in the realm of cryogenics where applying extreme cold to various materials will affect positively the "life" of the material. This occurs in a manner of realigning the molecules in a manner which reinforces them and in many cases strengthens the structure be that metal or in this case Nylon. Cold treated firearm barrels show increases in wear resistance over the life of the barrel and guitar strings are another. Exact temperature tables are fluid (which means there is discrepancy concerning how cold and how long the exposure) though there is enough evidence that the process holds truck. The same has been said to work with Nylon, from fishing line to hosiery. I know not should temps achieved in a typical freezer yield the same results as say exposure to liquid nitrogen though as Susan has made note simple cold available to the most of us had an effect in the affirmative. Check out what Wikipedia has on the subject to gain more insights. I have heard of auto racers subjecting engine blocks to the deep freeze ( with liquid nitrogen) a rather expensive undertaking considering the volume needed and engine block size that they claim to have been worth the efforts. 

So, I'd say the technique should have application. Perhaps members might experiment and those who have access to better facilities may try colder exposure. Do let us know. I would also venture that this would work with all Nylon fibers and weaves, from plain flat knits, micro mesh to the stretchy stuff to include Lycra infused hosiery.   

Cool topic F (pun intended) and glad you asked!

Tipples,

Dworkin      

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Apologies for going off topic, this is addressed to Dworkin, either I'm becoming Americanised or your becoming Anglicised because I actually understood 99% of your post. Mutual understanding is within our grasp.

Respect Bro, John B.

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