shinyvixen

Do Women Realize The Difference Between Plain Knit And Mesh Nylon Stockings?

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I was curious, especially for those ladies who are old enough to have grown up wearing gartered nylon stockings. Originally, all nylon stockings were flat (plain) knit and seamed and then even with circular knitting machines the stockings were still plain knit. That is the variety that makes the stockings shine and feel so slippery and make that "shick-shick-shick" sound under a tight skirt and a zipping sound when a lady sits and crosses her legs. Sadly only around two of the original "Reading" machines exist today that are capable of making such hosiery, one machine is in England, the other in France! A real shame when there were once nearly 600 stocking manufacturers!

Mesh stockings made of a rougher nylon came about in the early 70's and these did not shine and felt pebbly or rough to the touch, like sandpaper! They made the popular Hanes sheers until 1992 but sadly the market dried up when stockings went out of fashion. The only stockings you can get today, many are mesh, others though nicely knit contain lycra which isn't as good as the old fashioned vintage sheers.

When you ladies bought nylon stockings did you seek out the smooth plain knit stockings or just grab anything in your size off the rack? Did you realize the difference between those shiny, silky, zippy nylons and the scratchy ones or didn't it matter? I would think silky beats scratchy anyday, but time after time I've had girlfriends who more often than not bought the cheap scratchy ones! Why is that??

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Iam not a laddy but i do remenber those days. I all ways wondered how the noise were made. I think that is what made me wanting to wear and I do rember the feeling and it was great.

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The difference between flat knit and mesh are as different as night and day. Being of the 1960's group of stocking ladies it's easy for me to notice the difference. Flat knit are smooth and shiny like a fine glossy paint finish. Mesh reminds me of the micro fiber cloth of today. Both mesh and micro are like a cling type fine sandpaper. The mesh had a satin or at best a semi gloss type sheen. The mesh were cheaper also. There was actually another style to choose from and to my knowledge only Hanes offered these. This was a style called walking sheer. Made of heavier yarn these stockings were a utility every day working girl stocking. These had a bit of a stretch to them as well as a dull luster and wore like cast iron. So we had dress sheer, walking sheer and mesh. Hanes to my knowledge did not make mesh nor did other hosiery companies make walking sheer as Hanes did.

Susan

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I agree totally with Susan...Hanes 415 stockings were the most silky and sheer stockings. They made RHT's that are still sought after today...they also made the alking sheers (615) as well as the mesh..but..they also made the Cantrece..such a nasty stocking...they looked lkie smoething out of a horror movie..wrinkled, stretchy and so very unflattering.

Gone are the "good ol' days"..Thankfully we have such lovely ladies such as Susan and Shinyvixen and the ladies here on SHQ to keep the stockings shining and alive.

Bless you all...xxxxxxxxxxxx

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I remember way back when I was in high school, as I've stated before, loved to admire the girls covered legs. And if I was very fortunate, catch a peek of the pettipants, or welt, or both. At the time, I never really analyzed it too much. But I knew that I liked the girls wearing the more linear, or flat knit, hosiery, than the more crisscross, or mesh, pattern of hosiery. I also noted that the more 'affluent' girls tended to wear the flat knit hosiery. So I suppose that the flat knit was more expensive. But I remember treasuring the flat knit hosiery over the mesh type.

It's interesting that my memory can be jogged in this way by reading the forum posts. It brings back so many memories I lived through during my adolescent years. And it's truly amazing that are so many kindred spirits out there that have experienced, or are able to relate to, the same feelings I have during these 'growing up' years.

Even now, after all these years, and all the admiring of the diaphaneous covering on women's legs, I still can't totally understand Why? Is it a sexual thing? Is it a fetish aimed at the shine and sheen appearance of the hosiery? In my case, it isn't that, because I always imagine the items on the woman's leg and thigh.

I'm going off on a tangent, but as I was typing my post, so many thoughts and images were traveling through my pea brain.

There's a key out there somewhere, to this lock of the reasons for the origin and methodology for these thoughts and feelings a person has inside. But I'll be damned if I can find it! Maybe it's for the best!

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Two reasons: 1. The mesh are more forgiving, and each brand fits differently, so if you're not sure you can avoid expensive mistakes by getting the mesh, which brings me to two 2. Plain knit are generally more expensive. I would wear stockings everyday if I could, but I can't afford the stockings or the different outfits to go with them or the shoes. I'm a broke grad student.

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I think part of that allure you are talking about Rowlf is whatever the physical leg type of a female had the eye catching ability was increased ten fold when those same legs were covered in sheer stockings. Bobby socks or knee high socks sure as hell did nothing for a high school guy as far a female leg appeal went. Put a real wall flower that would normally wear socks into a pair of glassine RH&T stockings and show her how to toe dangle a penny loafer and a goddess has been created. Bare skin is flat and has and shows no dimension,depth or muscle structure. Look at body builders that color and oil their skin to bring out the muscular structure and cuts. This makes the body appear in high definition with three dimensions. When that wall flower slips into a leg covering that has color, especially a darker color and that covering shines it brings out the physical detail of the legs. It makes those God given curves just "POP"! Every visual muscle becomes alive! Close your eyes and remember a girl with great calves in stockings. What did you see when walking behind her? Watching those muscles flex under her stockings was like watching a three d movie and it was poetry in motion. The stockings made the legs a show piece of depth and visual movement. How hot did a slim ankle appear adorned in a shiny stocking. An eye catcher, right? Regardless of shape or size because every man had different taste but back in our days a doll in sexy glassine stockings could melt a heart with that new found way to show off her legs. Just like an a hot paint job on a car it brings out the structure and curves. Bare legs and primer coat need help to sell what they naturally hold so hosiery and glossy paint were invented. This make any sense?

Susan

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As Usual, Susan (aka stocking queen) knows us (stockinged legmen) so well. I was lucky enough to learn early on the difference between plain or flat knit and mesh or micro stockings. This was in the day of Elmer Batters. And the 'shine line' produced by those beautiful plain knit stockngs was a real attention grabber. Some of my classmates (often cheerleaders) wore stockings to class with nice short skirts and the views of those heel reinforcements and welts made listening to the teacher very difficult. In chemistry class, my lab partner was a tall slender blonde who didn't know a beaker from a flask and I did all the lab work, but I didn't care...because when I got things out of our lab drawer (the bottom one) I could look at her legs and ankles closely enough to see the plain knit weave of her nylons...ahh school days. My first date however did wear RHT mesh, although I had hoped she had worn plain knits. Yes Susan the glassy shine of the stockings was a tip to the plain knit weave. By the way, Triumph made the pinpoint mesh which was amazingly silky and slippery, not rough like most mesh.

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I think part of that allure you are talking about Rowlf is whatever the physical leg type of a female had the eye catching ability was increased ten fold when those same legs were covered in sheer stockings. This make any sense?

Susan

Susan, it makes a lot of sense. And these kind of things are hard to put into words. It's amazing to me that these feelings have been with me so long, and so many others share this 'affliction'! :) But it's still there, and it's real! :D

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... There was actually another style to choose from and to my knowledge only Hanes offered these. This was a style called walking sheer. Made of heavier yarn these stockings were a utility every day working girl stocking. ... Hanes to my knowledge did not make mesh nor did other hosiery companies make walking sheer as Hanes did.

I hesitate to take issue with an expert like Susan but I must. I believe that many manufactrers made walking sheer stockings; it's all in the denier. Finer than 20 - dress or evening sheer; typically 30 denier walking or day sheer; and typically 60 denier service sheer or service weight. But Hanes tended to be more explicit in thier naming of walking sheer.

Secondly, Hanes did make mesh stockings - see http://www.ebay.ca/itm/1-PAIR-HANES-VINTAGE-NYLON-STOCKINGS-11-M-HOSE-HOSIERY-GARTERS-/251011173941?pt=Vintage_Women_s_Clothing&hash=item3a716e8e35 but looking at the packaging I have seen, I would judge only late in the day.

... Hanes also made the walking sheers (615) as well as the mesh..but..they also made the Cantrece..such a nasty stocking...they looked lkie smoething out of a horror movie..wrinkled, stretchy and so very unflattering.

Hanes had a simple coding system: the first figure was the style eg 4 for RHT and the second two figures the denier. So, 430 were 30 denier RHT - walking sheer (see above). The 615s were sandal heel in 15 denier. I don't remember all of them but the micromesh stockings I mentioned were 115s.

Two reasons: 1. The mesh are more forgiving, and each brand fits differently, so if you're not sure you can avoid expensive mistakes by getting the mesh, which brings me to two 2. Plain knit are generally more expensive. I would wear stockings everyday if I could, but I can't afford the stockings or the different outfits to go with them or the shoes. I'm a broke grad student.

No one has mentioned that even at 15 denier, mesh stockings are much more durable than their fragile plain knit equivalents. Add to that the plain were more expensive, and so wearing plain knit as normal stockings was not for the less affluent ladies.

But yes, I agree that Hanes are the loveliest stockings I ever wear - just a pity that (as was normal then) they are short - even when described as long. But under my male clothes I wear mesh because they are so much more durable.

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I too am from the high school in the 60's and what has been said by both Susan and Classic6015 are soo true.

Can anyone turn back the clock?

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Ya, where I lived as a kid we did not have access to bigger stores so I see my knowledge is not the best. I made my assumptions by what old Goldblatts had to offer and how much money I had to spend. We did okay though and kept the boys parked at the bottom of the stairs and steady peeking up.

Susan

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Further to and demostrating my comments above, I see that there is a pair of vintage '70 denier Service Weight' stockings on ebay today. See: http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Vintage-Nylon-Seamed-Stockings-NIB-Hollywood-Hose-Size-11-Cuban-Heel-2-Pair-/260972938591?pt=Vintage_Women_s_Clothing&hash=item3cc333055f

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Hello All:

Susan's memory of the boys in high school waiting at the bottom of the stairs sure brings back memories for me! What innocent fun we all had back in the mid to late 60s. And for you guys who were standing there, we girls knew very well why you were there...and we loved it! Well, at least most of us did!

Regarding plain knit and mesh nylons, it's all in the knitting method, as someone else pointed out. Mesh nylons were introduced in the early to mid 1950s and became popular due to their ability to resist runs better than plain knit nylons. Sometimes they were called "kant-runs". Classic mesh and micromesh stockings don't run when snagged (like plain knits do), they develop a hole. Micromesh stockings quickly became popular with teenagers because they were far more durable than plain knits, particularly given the abuse a teen gives to her stockings.

When I first started wearing nylons in 1961, my Mom bought me teenage stretch stockings which were always mesh knit. When my legs filled out enough to wear adult stockings, she bought me only 15 denier micromesh for school as I was pretty hard on nylons. But around 1966, I convinced her that flat knit 20 denier Hanes Walking Sheers were even more durable than the micromesh 15s so she got me those. The 20 denier walking sheers became the staple of my hosiery wardrobe for the rest of high school. Being "premium" nylons, they also came in graduated lengths. I was always a tall kid, and as hemlines rose, my Mom felt it was worth spending a bit more on long length stockings for me to keep the tops out of view.

Believe me, most of us girls knew the difference between plain knits and micromesh. Cheap micromesh stockings felt like sandpaper on your legs and they made an even louder rasping sound when you crossed your legs than plain knits did. As someone mentioned, Triumph, and other premium stocking manufacturers made mesh stockings that were silky to the touch. I have some of these now and they are quite nice. But we girls had no knowledge of these in the 1960s.

Before I was allowed to wear nylons, I used to sneak runny old pairs of my Mom's plain knit FFs and wear them in bed. When I received my first pair of teen stretch seamless for my 10th birthday, I hated the rough scratchy feel they had and the fact that they didn't have that glossy sheen. To me, they were "baby nylons" and I was quite disappointed in them. By the time I was 13, and had filled out enough to wear adult nylons, I coaxed my Mom into buying me some flat knit RH&Ts, but I was only allowed to wear them to church. For school, it was strictly micromesh. Even my Mom saved her flat knits for dress once she switched to seamless hose around 1960...she wore micromesh for every day.

One other point...mesh and plain knit nylons were the same price during the 1960s. Cheap plain knits were available alongside cheap micromesh...both sometimes selling for as little as 29 cents a pair. As a comparison, Hanes stockings retailed at $1.50 a pair and were "fair traded" meaning it was not allowed to discount them. So whether a gal bought cheap, intermediate or premium priced stockings in the 1960s, they were all available as either plain knit or mesh. But most chose the mesh due to their hard-wearing characteristics.

I remember going to buy nylons in Filene's Basement in Boston with my Mom back then. The spiel from the hosiery saleslady was always the same...size? seams or seamless? Mesh or plain knit? Color? Then she would grab a box of three or four pairs and put her hand in one stocking to show you the color.

Oh to go back then...

Karen

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Onyx,

I always wanted the girls to appreciate my interest in their legs, but they certainly didn't act like it. Some of the looks I received while being discovered would make me wilt! :lol:

Your post also reminded me of the girls using fingernail polish to stop runs from getting worse. :)

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I’ve had a look at all of the Hanes stockings on ebay and checked with a couple of other sites to confirm the Hanes numbering system for its traditional, flat knit stockings.

  • 415 – The 15 denier ‘reinforced sheer’ RHT we all know and love.

  • 530 – 30 denier ‘Walking Sheer’ RHT.

  • 615 – 15 denier sheer heel demi-toe.

  • 715 – 15 denier nude heel and toe.

So, in general, the first digit denotes style and the final 2 the denier. Why walking sheers have a 5 when, in all other respects but denier, they are identical to 415s, I don’t know. Logically, they should be 430.

Other numbers I found:

  • 115 – Micromesh – no indication as to denier or whether these are RHT but I think we can assume 15 denier.

  • 210 – Cantrece heel and toe ie RHT

  • 220 – Cantrece sandal foot – UGH!

  • 728 – Silk Reflections – ‘modern’ stockings 92% Nylon, 8% Spandex sandal foot.

I suspect that 115 fits with the above scheme. The others may not.

I’m sure that we are all familiar with the length coding system used by Hanes. The letter L, M or S was added to the style number denoting Long, Medium or Short. The picot top was colour coded as follows: Green is long; White is medium; and Blue is short. I believe that there is a very rare Extra Long variety, which I think was red.

While doing this research, I came across the very sad news that since late 2009/early 2010 Hanes no longer make any stockings at all. Style 728 (see above) was the last garter stocking that Hanes produced. We know that Hanes has not made its wonderful ‘traditional’ stockings for a long time, but the fact that they now produce no stockings at all must be a matter of sadness.

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You learn something new everyday. I never quite new why some of the vintage stockings I bought Mrs Ratrob were silky and shiny and some felt so rough. I had noticed that I didn't care for the mesh stockings and now I can understand why. I once bought her a couple pair of RHT's in a wonderful hot pink color but was so disappointed at how rough they felt. I loved the color but hated the feel.

What a wonderful resource here for us nylon freaks

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Hi, i believe the color designation for the Hanes Extra Long is aqua.

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Hi, i believe the color designation for the Hanes Extra Long is aqua.

I stand corrected

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Onyx,

I always wanted the girls to appreciate my interest in their legs, but they certainly didn't act like it. Some of the looks I received while being discovered would make me wilt! :lol:

Your post also reminded me of the girls using fingernail polish to stop runs from getting worse. :)

Hi Rowlf:

I loved the attention from the boys in high school as did most of my friends. But there definetly WERE some girls who didn't get the whole thing and who thought you boys were awful. To me, it was innocent fun for both the girls and the boys. I can tell you that we girls did talk about this in the privacy of the girls room!

And regarding the nail polish thing, I ALWAYS carried a bottle in my purse "for emergencies". What I don't get, looking back, is why it took us girls so long to figure out that clear nail polish would work much better as a run stop than pink or red! I think I was a senior in high school before I stopped using my normal shade of pink!

Karen

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Hi Alan and Bailey:

Thank you for this run-down of Hanes model numbers. I have a catalog somewhere that lists these but I can't seem to locate it,

And being 5'-8" tall by my Junior year in HS I can assure you I was a green stripe girl! I never knew about the Extra Longs.

Karen

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The color at the top of the welt on Hanes original flat knit stockings are as follows:

Blue: short length

White: regular length

Green: long length

Aqua: extra long length

These color indicators were available in all basic styles, sizes and colors. The green edged stockings were available in larger sizes but the aqua was nearly impossible to find. Hanes made stockings up to 12 1/2 extra long but since most women are much shorter I never noticed any department store that ever sold them or kept them on hand. It's a real shame too, as Hanes went out of the "real" stocking business back in 1992!

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Hey shinyvixen I gotta open my big Gypsy yapper here and question the information about Hanes Extra Long Stockings. I'm not saying it's not so but I'd have to see a pair to believe it. Since I was married in 1971 I've shopped all the hosiery dedicated shops in Chicago and fine hosiery counters all over this country and have never seen nor heard of Hanes Extra Long. Alberts or Araline maybe but Hanes=? I know today's second fashioining of what an Italian company is attempting to pass off as Hanes might fall into this catagory but that's about it. All their sizes have a white band at the top and many web sites that sell hosiery offer these second hand so called Hanes to people who are thinking they are real vintage stockings. They could not use the color coding for legal reasons. Anyway, you show me a pair and I'll believe it. Hey old time stocking gals like Karen and HanesBaby here say they are totally unaware of this Aqua colored band then I would question this information. We grew up in that time and we knew some girls that we pushing six feet tall and all we had were Hanes Green band. As I said I would have to see it to believe it. I'm going to contact a good friend of mine. He was a writer for Leg Show and is a member here. He's Frank Sinclair! He knows as much about vintage/retro stockings as an Indiana farmer knows that his corn is yellow. Until he says it's the real deal I'll doubt it until I hear from him or see a pair with my brown Gypsy eyes. Hey and if I'm wrong I'll happily stand corrected.

Susan

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I did see an ad on Ebay for a pair of "aqua" "extra long" Hanes stockings on two occasions recently. These had the familiar Hanes "chromograph" the logo stamp on the welt, including the diamond pattern at the bottom of the welt. So I am assuming these are legitimate.

As far as "knock-offs" the only company making Hanes copies seems to be "Secrets in lace" the online vintage lingerie shop with the WAY high prices!

I was not aware that there's any hosiery maker in Italy still making original hose. I did learn that National was having their old style #400's made somewhere in Africa for a while but they were of poor quality. The only two working original "Reading" machines that still exist are split between a company in England and one in France. These machines are 60 feet long and have something like 18,000 needles that have to be synchronized to knit and that keeping these machines in operation is a dying art! A shame!

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I was curious, especially for those ladies who are old enough to have grown up wearing gartered nylon stockings. Originally, all nylon stockings were flat (plain) knit and seamed and then even with circular knitting machines the stockings were still plain knit. That is the variety that makes the stockings shine and feel so slippery and make that "shick-shick-shick" sound under a tight skirt and a zipping sound when a lady sits and crosses her legs. Sadly only around two of the original "Reading" machines exist today that are capable of making such hosiery, one machine is in England, the other in France! A real shame when there were once nearly 600 stocking manufacturers!

Mesh stockings made of a rougher nylon came about in the early 70's and these did not shine and felt pebbly or rough to the touch, like sandpaper! They made the popular Hanes sheers until 1992 but sadly the market dried up when stockings went out of fashion. The only stockings you can get today, many are mesh, others though nicely knit contain lycra which isn't as good as the old fashioned vintage sheers.

When you ladies bought nylon stockings did you seek out the smooth plain knit stockings or just grab anything in your size off the rack? Did you realize the difference between those shiny, silky, zippy nylons and the scratchy ones or didn't it matter? I would think silky beats scratchy anyday, but time after time I've had girlfriends who more often than not bought the cheap scratchy ones! Why is that??

Fact: Mesh nylons came out in the 1950's. I have vintage Albert's Hosiery Inc boxes of them with the welts stamped that the Stamping was discontinued by 1963. check a website called http://www.nylonstocking.net/nylonsales/alberts/Rht/mesh/meshAlberts.htm

Fact: the nylon thread used in those days is long ago discontinued. Its too expensive to produce and is gone forever.

I think http://www.gerbe.com/ makes a very very nice vintage reproduction stocking today, but not Gio ones. They are just very expensive, though, imported.

Janis

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I recently watched a short documentary on Youtube about Japanese nylons. It covers mostly tights but there's a segment on stockings and how the industry is reviving with a lot of younger women opting for fashion nylon legwear.

 

What might interest some of you is the different knit and yarn section, including a new type which sits halfway between sheer and matte.

 

The documentary can be found here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=THyARu6sfhM

 

N.

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My wife sometimes sell stockings on Ebay. She has several pairs of mesh full fashioned seamed stockings. These stockings have the key hole, fashion marks and reinforcements exactly like a flat knit pair. They are very durable but they don't have the sheen of flat knits.

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I have a picture posted of a pair of Hanes-extra long (Aqua-top) stockings I found on ebay.  I have seen them listed more than once so they must exist; they have the original Hanes chromograph so they aren't knock-offs. 

 

One interesting note on why these stockings are so elusive is because most stocking/lingerie stores only stocked the green-top Hanes (long) in a 10 1/2 or 11 1/2.  They had no call for extra-long stockings so usually didn't stock them.  Unless a ladies basketball team was needing stockings for a night on the town this item was usually a special order only.  Hanes made their classic "plain knit" sheer hose until 1992.

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Hi Shiny and All.

 

The Hane's I think being refereed to have a very distinctive green band at the top noticeably different than the more pale green one indicating long. I believe someone here at SHQ eons ago explained the difference when I made inquiry as I've had these pass through in the past and have on spare occasion seen them. Part of the explanation (as I recall) had something to do with "being made in Canada) which makes little sense as my understanding has that Hane's were made in North Carolina though on that I may stand corrected. The other part had that these were as stated extra long and my understanding about the color coded bands from Hane's (perhaps others) is about two inches. Related, those I've seen have been packaged entirely differently than "regular" Hane's offerings in that there was less visible in the manner of Hane's displayed so possibly these were marketed in Canada and may be relative to the bilingual nature culture. I may still have a pair a midst the lost stash of stuff I accumulated when for some misdirected set of thoughts I was going to open an antiques business with an emphasis on what all here might guess. This after I was laid off from the antiques place I was at for many years. Brilliant ideas I've sometimes, I just need to think about paying the bill for all that brilliance in advance.

 

Bottom line- these must exist somewhere as they were obviously produced though in likely very low numbers. And Shiny, you are right about sizes as 12 Longs were not easy to find everywhere. Fortunately I had access to big metro areas back when so they were less elusive at least for me though as in all classic hosiery were becoming the odd item. Last, I did not recall Hane's made those gems until 1992. My references had they quit long before that. Pity for those few to appreciate. Thanks greatly for the info.

 

Enjoy,

Dworkin 

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flat knit:

s-l1600k.jpg

flat knit:

Vintage-Brown-Black-RHT-Flat-Knit-Super-Sheer-_57.jpg

micro mesh:

3316994525_b8505b0186_b.jpg

micro mesh

s-l16oi00.jpg

micro mesh

s-l1600.jpg

flat knit

s-l160ll0.jpg

Edited by nylon_fan
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i believe there are two sets of reading machines in Nottingham gio at loscoe and touchable

at eastwood

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Flat knit are so much smoother than the mesh. Mesh is like a cheese grater. No wonder women choose to go bare legged :-((, as most have never felt the smooth silky feel of what I call 'real' nylons, those that are flat knit.....

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On 12/23/2013 at 8:15 AM, shinyvixen said:

I have a picture posted of a pair of Hanes-extra long (Aqua-top) stockings I found on ebay.  I have seen them listed more than once so they must exist; they have the original Hanes chromograph so they aren't knock-offs. 

 

One interesting note on why these stockings are so elusive is because most stocking/lingerie stores only stocked the green-top Hanes (long) in a 10 1/2 or 11 1/2.  They had no call for extra-long stockings so usually didn't stock them.  Unless a ladies basketball team was needing stockings for a night on the town this item was usually a special order only.  Hanes made their classic "plain knit" sheer hose until 1992.

Well shinyvixen, I'll sit here and say "I'm Wrong"  Hanes did make a 12 long stocking!  I never saw a pair of size 12 long stockings in my entire life at the stores.  So it's shinyvixen 1 and Susan 0!  Way to go buddy!

Susan

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On 3/5/2012 at 11:41 AM, rowlf said:

I remember way back when I was in high school,

Wait, what??? Rowlf attended high school???

 

Mr FG

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10 hours ago, Mr & Mrs Farmgirl said:

Wait, what??? Rowlf attended high school???

 

Mr FG

Probably around the time this thread started!!!

Way to revive!

KtF
:58674be5313cc_EmojiSmiley-12:

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I well remember as a young boy being absolutely mesmerized by the sound of the stocking clad ladies of my mother's bridge club  crossing their legs.

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I think some of those people who are now listing 'vintage' stockings on eBay for ridiculous amounts are hoping some buyers won't notice/care/mind about 'mesh' knits...I have very nearly been caught out when looking to buy on there! 

Buyer beware!...

Flat knit are the ones to have, IMHO...

Lisa x

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My particular love of stockings arose in the late 60's due to floor level exposure as a young boy to Aunty Val's nyloned toes.

I had no idea then of course that her painted toes always shone through light tan micromesh stockings but was always fascinated at the detail of the nylon material and every time I see a pair of Aristoc 555 or similar adorning red toes and that gorgeous underfoot seam I am transported back to 1967 and playing with my car's next to Aunty Val...

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On 12/22/2013 at 6:14 AM, Norm_uk said:

I recently watched a short documentary on Youtube about Japanese nylons. It covers mostly tights but there's a segment on stockings and how the industry is reviving with a lot of younger women opting for fashion nylon legwear.

 

What might interest some of you is the different knit and yarn section, including a new type which sits halfway between sheer and matte.

 

The documentary can be found here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=THyARu6sfhM

 

N.

This explains why most japanese ladies in England still wear nylons. 

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